Shootout at Wadala: Once again, another round of ‘true’ rumors

“January 11 1982, till that day nothing so memorable like this ever took place between the Bombay police and the underworld. I had that longing to rewrite history. My name, Manya Surve.” Manya’s Achilles-like wish to etch his place in history would come true through his own death. A death which gave birth to the brutal but necessary and sometimes abused evil euphemistically dubbed as the ‘encounter.’ Now comes a motion picture rendition of arguably the most formative years in the history of the Mumbai underworld which predated the first ever police extra-judicial killing.

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The minds behind Shootout at Wadala (namely Director Sanjay Gupta and Producer Ekta Kapoor) will attempt to chronicle nine years of the Bombay underworld’s history based on the S. Hussain Zaidi authored novel pictured above. For the full 60 years and beyond, grab a copy of Dongri to Dubai: Six Decades of the Mumbai Mafia. It is worth a read for anyone fascinated by the multi-national enterprise that is D-Company and the Indian law & order landscape. While Zaidi is an accomplished crime journalist due to his vast networks comprising of the stewards of Mumbai’s underbelly, some will take his narrative with a grain of salt. With the movie however, I am definitely going to take the whole salt shaker as the book’s cover contains endorsements from the glamorous Shootout at Wadala star cast rather than distinguished intelligence/law enforcement figures. To be fair though, the talented crime reporter’s buddy and brilliant author, Vikram Chandra, wrote a glowing legitimate preface for the book. Why wouldn’t he? Chandra’s marvelous novel, Sacred Games, drew heavily fom Zaidi’s research and repertoire.

There were numerous myth versus reality complaints after the first awesome Shootout movie, Shootout at Lokhandwala. Will this upcoming film be the truthful outlier among the police-underworld dramatizations even with Gupta’s friendship with seal of approval from S. Hussain Zaidi? That is highly debatable because early reactions from the trailer have prompted the name changes of pivotal characters such as the Kaskar brothers and Isaq Bagwan. Even Bagwan, the man who carried out the first encounter claims that the film is not devoid of inaccuracies.  Apparently, Ekta Kapoor deliberately kept the original character names when filming in spite of Gupta’s protests that the names ‘Dawood’ and ‘Sabir’ would rub new salt on old wounds. This new buzz concerning these changes makes me second guess Gupta’s due diligence with respect to the facts. Well, it certainly would not be the first time. Plus, the first trailers with original names may have been used only to create a fake controversy so that news of these changes could further publicity.

As crazy as this may sound, it is almost as if pre-production for this movie began before the completion of Dongri to Dubai. For all you know, the fictionalized version of the 1992 JJ Hospital shooting (where D-Syndicate Lieutenants Sautya and Chota Shakeel turned one of Mumbai’s premier hospitals into a battleground to assassinate the killers of Dawood’s brother in law) is in development right now. Another interesting piece of information is Hussain Zaidi’s disdain for Bollywood itself as explained in a New York Times India Ink Blog Interview. When asked by blogger Malavika Vyawahare regarding his writings that divulged the Bollywood-Underworld nexus, he replied, “The film industry people are shameless people — anything they do or say is like water off a duck’s back.” This is the same film industry that has cemented Dawood Ibrahim Kaskar as the national Bin-Ladenesque villain indirectly associated with most terrorist activity in India.

Look no further than Once Upon a Time in Mumbai, a very ‘fantasized/non reality based’ account (according to Gupta himself when he proclaimed that Shootout at Wadala is more geared towards the truth) of the monster named Shoaib created by the Mumbai police to topple principled smuggler Sultan Mirza. Shoaib was obviously nothing more than an alias for Dawood whereas Sultan Mirza was modeled after Haji Mastan with shades of Madrasi gangster Varadarajan Mudaliar and Pathan Don Karim Lala. Who produced that movie? That person would be none other than Ekta Kapoor. Mastan, Mudaliar, and Lala did stick to their ‘old-school’ values by not crossing the lines Dawood did, but their Robin-Hood images have always been exaggerated. On celluloid, they are portrayed as: 1) thieves with principles 2) the voice of the voiceless and 3) averse to drugs and prostitution, a la Vito Corleone. The Varda Bhai-Haji Mastan duo made fortunes not just from smuggling goods imposed with unnecessary import duties, but from anti honorable thief operations like prostitution and illicit liquor. This by no means detracts from their philanthropy and generosity towards the underprivileged nor does it absolve Dawood of his crimes.

Nonetheless, Bollywood never fails to cash on old school gangs’ legacies as the lesser of the two evils forsaken by the police for the greater evil that is the D-Company. When asked who Mumbai’s misunderstood gangster was in another interview, even Mr. Zaidi reluctantly retorted, “Misunderstood and gangster don’t go hand in hand. Gangsters make themselves understood very well! If you insist, then Haji Mastan who was Scrooge personified but portrayed as a magnanimous Raja Harishchandra of his times.” While Dawood may have initially been the illegitimate child of the police’s agenda to subdue the Pathan stronghold on Mumbai, politicians are just as guilty of nurturing the D-Company regime (cough cough Sharad Pawar). You never see Bollywood depicting that do you?

Zaidi’s first book Black Friday: The True Story of the Bombay Bomb Blasts and its cinematic adaptation were not the usual desi-masala fares. Although same cannot be said for Dongri to Dubai and Shootout at Wadala. Regardless of whether Director Sanjay Gupta and Producer Ekta Kapoor may be exceptions to his stance on the Indian film industry, Hussain Zaidi’s journalistic and literary profile is sure to receive a boost on May 1, 2013. Not in the slightest way should this be interpreted as a knock on the S.A.W. team’s cinematic talents or efforts as it looks like one heck of an action flick. If not for the facts, this movie will be one to watch for some solid entertainment.

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