Shootout at Wadala: A Welcome Overdose of Bombay, Brutality, and “Bhai-giri”

Note: To those unfamiliar with names/events/terms specific to South Asian culture & gangland history, there is a glossary of terms in the post before this one. The word preceded by an asterisk  word will be elaborated upon in the entry ‘Glossary for SAW Movie Review.’

Whenever a novel or a portion of it is adapted onto celluloid, the book is always better 80 percent of the time. The same goes for last weekend’s release Shootout at Wadala which selectively draws from 65 pages of S. Hussain Zaidi’s book, Dongri to Dubai: Six Decades of the Mumbai Mafia.

Upon viewing the first SAW trailer via YouTube and reading reports of factual inaccuracies, I dropped all hopes for a truthful adaptation. Wishing for an honest cinematic depiction of events remotely connected to the years *1992-1993 is like writing a long letter to Santa Claus.

Back in February I devoted a whole post regarding the authenticity of the second Shootout feature. Initially Director Sanjay Gupta claimed that the film contained no fictionalization, but stories citing former *ACP Isaque Bagwan’s disapproval of excessive dramatization prompted character name changes and a disclaimer before the start of the movie (which fortunately stated ‘the film is a hybrid of fact and fiction’). Therefore, I will not delve into the myth vs. reality facets of the motion picture. Read Dongri to Dubai and Mafia Queens of Mumbai if you want to separate the fact from flack.

The spectacle starts off with gangster Manya Surve (John Abraham) being thrown into the back of a police van after taking 11 bullets from Afaque Bagran (played by Anil Kapoor, modeled upon Bagwan). Thanks to his immense strength, Manya still has some endurance to converse with the ACP during his final moments. Through flashback, he narrates how a broken justice system coupled with unfortunate circumstances transformed him from a brilliant college student to a ruthless, cunning hoodlum. Bagran also recounts the raging gang warfare between the *‘Mastan’ syndicate and the *Haksar Brothers (Manoj Bajpai as Zubair and Sonu Sood as Dilawar) amidst the backdrop of the same corrupt justice system. The audience watches the story of how the very first encounter came to be from the perspective of two men on opposite sides of the law.

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SAW is not for the faint of heart as the colorful language, grandiose violence, and lewdness would even make Quentin Tarantino squeamish. While the obscene language will require adults to earmuff their kids, viewers will also be treated to the most eloquent lines that any thespian would die to deliver. Thereby, Milap Zaveri’s dialogues are alone worth the ticket price.

The stunt sequences choreographed by Tinu Verma and Allan Amin take you back to the action of the 80s minus the ridiculous sound effects and high flying antics. The sheer physicality and violent blood baths have become staples of Sanjay Gupta films. Do not go into the theater expecting anything less.

The screenplay is fast-paced but it lacks the in depth analytical examination of the Mumbai Underworld featured in the 11 chapters from the source material. Although Surve’s image as Bombay’s first educated gangster is highlighted, his status as “Mumbai’s Hadley Chase” is completely ignored. Through inspiration from James Hadley Chase books, this Master Strategist robbed money from a government milk scam and plotted the assassination of the stealthiest Dons. Then again with SAW being a commercial flick for the masses, the tactician attribute of Manya’s personality would not resonate with every moviegoer.

Sanjay Gupta does a fabulous job of recreating the seedy Mumbai of the 70s and 80s. A grittier and comparatively realistic interpretation of the underworld’s formative years was long overdue for hardcore crime fiction buffs. He has done away with the awesome yet fantasized renditions of the mafia, a la Once Upon a Time in Mumbai. The slick editing (Bunty Nagi) and cinematography (Sameer Arya) make for some visually appealing cinema.

The performances will bring tough competition at numerous awards ceremonies next year. John Abraham has catapulted himself to the big leagues with his explosive portrayal of Manya Surve. Action Abraham puts his money where his mouth was when he compared his acting to that of Sanjay Dutt’s in Vaastav. Anil Kapoor offers the most powerful yet nuanced performance and he shows why he is still around. Sonu Sood is fantastic and really shines in the second half. Earlier Manoj Bajpai declared that he did not put much work into his role. That should come as no surprise as he naturally sinks into the skin of Zubair Imtiaz Haksar.

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Even though Tushar Kapoor enacts his part with gusto, he just does not physically fit the bill of *Sheikh Munir with his boyish looks. His role was tailor made for someone like Nawazuddin Siddiqui. Kangana Ranaut delivers a controlled performance as the object of Manya’s affections. Ronit Roy, Sanjeev Chadha, Siddhanth Kapoor, Karan Patel, Raju Mavani, and Raju Kher lend able support. The music is definitely memorable but the risqué item songs are totally redundant. Only one item number was necessary but as always, nothing sells like sex these days.

Whether you reside in Jersey City, NJ or Dadar, Mumbai, head to the nearest theatre to catch this compelling fare which offers a cinematic take on history. Aside from the truth which was promised awhile back, you cannot ask for more from this flick. A third Shootout film installment based on the incident that turned one of Mumbai’s premier hospitals into a mafioso warzone seems inevitable. Shootout at JJ Hospital? Bring it on!

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